Capacity Rights Agreement

As a general rule, anyone under the age of 18 is told that they are not in a position to enter into contracts. However, from a commercial point of view, there are a number of important exceptions to the law that prohibit minors from having abilities. A minor is allowed to enter into contracts on needs such as food, clothing and housing, i.e. purchases. In addition, some states allow minors to obtain bank and credit accounts. They are responsible for these accounts as if they were legally binding contracts. As an aspect of the social contract between a state and its citizens, the state plays a protective role for the weakest and most vulnerable members of society. As far as public order is concerned, it is the policy of parens patriae. Similarly, the State has a direct social and economic interest in promoting trade, by defining the forms of enterprises that can operate in its territory and by establishing rules that give enterprises and those wishing to enter into contracts with them a fair opportunity to gain value. This system worked well until social and commercial mobility became clear. Today, people routinely act and travel across national borders (physical and electronic), so it is necessary to ensure stability across national borders, as laws differ from state to state.

Thus, as soon as they are defined by personal law, people take their skills with them like a passport, whether they are allowed to travel or whatever they can travel. Whatever the cause, if the resulting situation is such that individuals cannot take care of themselves or act in a way that harms their interests, these people are vulnerable by their dependence and need the protection of the State from the risks of abuse or exploitation. Therefore, all agreements reached are questionable and a court may declare that person a ward of the state and give power to an appointed legal guardian. . . .